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Thread: mounting usb external

  1. #1
    Member 77yrold's Avatar
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    Default mounting usb external

    http://www.wallpaperama.com/forums/h...nd-t714.hUsing above URL reference point

    at this point typing in ls /mnt
    I am told on read out out I should see sda1, however I do not. I do see sda
    I feel the next concern is related to first for when I enter mount -t auto /dev/sda1 /mnt/usb
    it is saying I need to specify a file system.

    So why not showing sda1 and where in that second command line entry does the ext3 go

    To clarify my debian partition is hda

    Thanks from one of your returning Nemesis and one who appreciates you

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    Default Can you explain some more plz?

    as far my understanding, the USB device is having single partition which is nothing but /dev/sda

    before monting the usb check this
    is it new USB?(if yes first you have to format the disk)
    if its not new one and having data you can directly mount the USB..
    #mount /dev/sda /mnt
    Thanks,
    Surendra Kumar Anne
    Linux: Fast, friendly, flexible and .... free!
    Support Open source.
    http://www.linuxnix.com

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    Default

    OK sir,

    Here is how to find out your USB device's hardware address. I will show you the out put of fdisk -l twice. Once with the USB drive out. And once with it in. This way you can see the change and locate the address yourself. Also usually with ubuntu the usb drive will auto mount. If not here are the steps to mount USB drive.


    Secnario1: No USB Drive Plugged in:

    Code:
    jason@jason-desktop:~$ sudo fdisk -l
    [sudo] password for jason: 
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80000000000 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9726 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x7e5c7a5c
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *           1        9355    75144006   83  Linux
    /dev/sda2            9356        9726     2980057+   5  Extended
    /dev/sda5            9356        9726     2980026   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    Scenario2: USB Drive is plugged in:
    Code:
    jason@jason-desktop:~$ sudo fdisk -l
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80000000000 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9726 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x7e5c7a5c
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *           1        9355    75144006   83  Linux
    /dev/sda2            9356        9726     2980057+   5  Extended
    /dev/sda5            9356        9726     2980026   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    
    Disk /dev/sdb: 4063 MB, 4063232000 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 493 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1               1         494     3967960+   b  W95 FAT32
    Partition 1 has different physical/logical endings:
         phys=(1023, 254, 63) logical=(493, 252, 63)
    The USB drive I plugged into the system was 4GB. So what you do, is look for that size. I see it in this line. From the second output of code.

    Code:
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1               1         494     3967960+   b  W95 FAT32
    This tells me that my USB drive has a address of /dev/sdb1

    So in order to mount that from the command line. I would do the following. First decide where I want the mount point to be. The mount point is a directory on the filesystem. You can use /mnt or create your own. In this example I will use /mnt and create a sub directory called /mnt/usb. This is a 2 step process.

    Step1: Create mount point:
    Code:
    jason@jason-desktop:~$sudo mkdir -p /mnt/usb
    Step2: Mount the USB drive on the new directory.
    Code:
    jason@jason-desktop:~$sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt/usb
    Now you want to verify that it mounted correctly:
    Code:
    jason@jason-desktop:~$ df
    Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda1             73963548   3227764  66978584   5% /
    tmpfs                   508512         0    508512   0% /lib/init/rw
    varrun                  508512       108    508404   1% /var/run
    varlock                 508512         0    508512   0% /var/lock
    udev                    508512       156    508356   1% /dev
    tmpfs                   508512       492    508020   1% /dev/shm
    lrm                     508512      2192    506320   1% /lib/modules/2.6.28-15-generic/volatile
    /dev/sr0                715732    715732         0 100% /media/cdrom0
    /dev/sdb1              3960208   3020000    940208  77% /mnt/usb/JAY DRIVE
    jason@jason-desktop:~$
    The drive is labeled JAY DRIVE, so you can see it in the last line of the df command output.

    HTH,

    Jaysunn

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    Member 77yrold's Avatar
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    Default : mounting usb external Reply to Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by jaysunn View Post
    OK sir,

    Here is how to find out your USB device's hardware address. I will show you the out put of fdisk -l twice. Once with the USB drive out. And once with it in. This way you can see the change and locate the address yourself. Also usually with ubuntu the usb drive will auto mount. If not here are the steps to mount USB drive.


    Secnario1: No USB Drive Plugged in:

    Code:
    jason@jason-desktop:~$ sudo fdisk -l
    [sudo] password for jason: 
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80000000000 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9726 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x7e5c7a5c
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *           1        9355    75144006   83  Linux
    /dev/sda2            9356        9726     2980057+   5  Extended
    /dev/sda5            9356        9726     2980026   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    Scenario2: USB Drive is plugged in:
    Code:
    jason@jason-desktop:~$ sudo fdisk -l
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80000000000 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9726 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x7e5c7a5c
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *           1        9355    75144006   83  Linux
    /dev/sda2            9356        9726     2980057+   5  Extended
    /dev/sda5            9356        9726     2980026   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    
    Disk /dev/sdb: 4063 MB, 4063232000 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 493 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1               1         494     3967960+   b  W95 FAT32
    Partition 1 has different physical/logical endings:
         phys=(1023, 254, 63) logical=(493, 252, 63)
    The USB drive I plugged into the system was 4GB. So what you do, is look for that size. I see it in this line. From the second output of code.

    Code:
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1               1         494     3967960+   b  W95 FAT32
    This tells me that my USB drive has a address of /dev/sdb1

    So in order to mount that from the command line. I would do the following. First decide where I want the mount point to be. The mount point is a directory on the filesystem. You can use /mnt or create your own. In this example I will use /mnt and create a sub directory called /mnt/usb. This is a 2 step process.

    Step1: Create mount point:
    Code:
    jason@jason-desktop:~$sudo mkdir -p /mnt/usb
    Step2: Mount the USB drive on the new directory.
    Code:
    jason@jason-desktop:~$sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt/usb
    Now you want to verify that it mounted correctly:
    Code:
    jason@jason-desktop:~$ df
    Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda1             73963548   3227764  66978584   5% /
    tmpfs                   508512         0    508512   0% /lib/init/rw
    varrun                  508512       108    508404   1% /var/run
    varlock                 508512         0    508512   0% /var/lock
    udev                    508512       156    508356   1% /dev
    tmpfs                   508512       492    508020   1% /dev/shm
    lrm                     508512      2192    506320   1% /lib/modules/2.6.28-15-generic/volatile
    /dev/sr0                715732    715732         0 100% /media/cdrom0
    /dev/sdb1              3960208   3020000    940208  77% /mnt/usb/JAY DRIVE
    jason@jason-desktop:~$
    The drive is labeled JAY DRIVE, so you can see it in the last line of the df command output.

    HTH,

    Jaysunn
    Appreciate quick response and I have no intention of putting this down until I am really comfortable with it and you are the "MAN"
    Look over these two attachments and tell me where I am and what must I do. And my friend I appreciate any extra effort that is required on your part to penetrate my aging cerebellum
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    Default

    77,

    Sorry for the delay. Are you still trying to mount a USB device? From the screenshots, I do not see anything plugged into the USB port.

    Plug the device in, and take a screenshot. I will give you the exact syntax to mount your drive.

    Jaysunn

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    Member 77yrold's Avatar
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    Default

    I more then likely am trying to accomplish too much with USB, but here is my vision at any rate.
    I would like to be able to use 1 partition to have Linux OS Knoppix in fact, but have had bad luck in past attempting to get a OS from a USB into a boot sequence. So I know its possible to load grub to root but access ?????????
    The other partition I would like for data. Hence the fat32 which probable is right for windows but not sure about the OS. Finally probably could have left swap out and the Live CD would have created it.
    Jay more then you bargained for, but you have it there in that information bank of your somewhere
    Thanks
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    Contributors jaysunn's Avatar
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    77,

    I admire your wanting to learn drives and partitioning. However I will have to be honest with you. I use SUN virtual Box to have as many operating systems on my machine that my heart can desire. I have really never went at it with a Hard Drive like you have.

    I would suggest. Keep in mind, just a suggestion. Install Linux or Windows on one huge partition and run virtual machines. It relieves a lot of headaches.

    As of now. I have A Mac Book Pro unibody laptop. Running SUN virtual box with, Ubuntu, rhel5, Windows XP , Windows 7 and Fedora. I never used gparted for all of this.

    I do not want to discourage you, however this is the trend now.

    Jaysunn

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    Default mounting usb external Reply to Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by jaysunn View Post
    77,

    I admire your wanting to learn drives and partitioning. However I will have to be honest with you. I use SUN virtual Box to have as many operating systems on my machine that my heart can desire. I have really never went at it with a Hard Drive like you have.

    That simple paragraph and a lot of googling turned on some lights for me. Exciting for this old man cause stayed at this PC all day sunday went tobed 4 hours and back again.

    I would suggest. Keep in mind, just a suggestion. Install Linux or Windows on one huge partition and run virtual machines. It relieves a lot of headaches.

    I may not have it all figured out yet and my approach may even be backward. But the attachment represents the neighborhood where virtual box will live. The host for me will be Debian Lenny and I re-equipped this baby with kde as well as gnome. You might say I got a sun roof, butt warmers the whole shotting match.

    As of now. I have A Mac Book Pro unibody laptop. Running SUN virtual box with, Ubuntu, rhel5, Windows XP , Windows 7 and Fedora. I never used gparted for all of this.

    You started something there as well.I ued the same live Debian CD on install, but I choose the graphical I guess advanced approach and repartitioned as I installed debian. So I did not use gparted at all. WOW a departure for me.

    I do not want to discourage you, however this is the trend now.

    On the contrary I am as excited as a challenged old man can be. You lucky Jay I got a strong heart. This might have cause coronary in others I also know and have confidence that I can fix whatever is broke. I might need a helping hand from Jay but I will not crash and burn.
    My new Debian is my Enterprise and I am Capt. Kirk. Virtual Box is going to be my universe.


    Have you ever stopped to think the impact you and users like you have on the growth of a given user given their honest conviction to climb the Linux ladder.
    You do make a difference. Stand up take bow

    You will be hearing from me again


    Cheers


    Jaysunn
    Just learned something when I tried to preview this post. Obviously preview is tied to some character protocol after quote not way I did this one. And I can preview now so I was right.
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