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Thread: USB external storage partition

  1. #1
    Member 77yrold's Avatar
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    Default USB external storage partition

    In the couple years I have been on Linux I have collected and categorized a huge amt data
    that has me in a rather comprising position given my 40GB HD
    I installed a 160 GB USB external projecting movement to same but I need the command line procedure for mount, mnt. pt. ownership/permission, rw
    For now I will do it with 1 partition which I made ext3 labeled data1
    Please advise is as user friendly fashion as needed for 77 yr old comprehension.
    Hey not a joke, merely a reality
    Thank you so much

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    Contributors jaysunn's Avatar
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    Hello give this a try:


    Become root or use sudo:

    Code:
    Prompt>sudo -s
    Plug your device into the system and identify the correct partition name.

    Code:
    Prompt>dmesg |grep -i 'USB device'
    Or you can use this to identify.

    Code:
    Prompt>grep USB /var/log/messages
    You should see something similar to this:

    Code:
    Aug  29 11:52:26 kernel: USB device sda1: 3903488 512-byte hdwr sectors (1999 MB)
    Now we are going to Mount the partition to an existing mount point (directory).

    Create the mount point. I think you already created /data1 as you mentioned.

    Code:
    Prompt>mkdir -p /mnt/data1
    Now let's mount the drive on the new mount point. Remember if yours is not /dev/sda1 change it to what you received from the grep of /var/log/messages.


    Code:
    Prompt>mount -t vfat -o rw,users /dev/sda1 /mnt/usbdevice
    Verify that are mount was successful with:

    Code:
    Prompt>mount
    You should see something like this:

    Code:
    /dev/sda1 on /mnt/usbdevice type vfat (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
    To remove the USB drive you must unmount.

    Code:
    Prompt>umount /mnt/usbdevice

    Permission should be Read And Writable as is. If not please Post the output of this command:

    Code:
    la -alh /mnt/usbdevice
    If you have issues in any of the above steps. Do not hesitate to post the error or your question or concern.

    You found one of the best linux help sites out there. And someone here will get you to where you want to be.

    77 Yrs Young......... Wow


    Jaysunn

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    Member 77yrold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaysunn View Post
    Hello give this a try:


    Become root or use sudo:

    Code:
    Prompt>sudo -s
    Plug your device into the system and identify the correct partition name.

    Code:
    Prompt>dmesg |grep -i 'USB device'
    Or you can use this to identify.

    Code:
    Prompt>grep USB /var/log/messages
    You should see something similar to this:

    Code:
    Aug  29 11:52:26 kernel: USB device sda1: 3903488 512-byte hdwr sectors (1999 MB)
    Now we are going to Mount the partition to an existing mount point (directory).

    Create the mount point. I think you already created /data1 as you mentioned.

    Code:
    Prompt>mkdir -p /mnt/data1
    Now let's mount the drive on the new mount point. Remember if yours is not /dev/sda1 change it to what you received from the grep of /var/log/messages.


    Code:
    Prompt>mount -t vfat -o rw,users /dev/sda1 /mnt/usbdevice
    Verify that are mount was successful with:

    Code:
    Prompt>mount
    You should see something like this:

    Code:
    /dev/sda1 on /mnt/usbdevice type vfat (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
    To remove the USB drive you must unmount.

    Code:
    Prompt>umount /mnt/usbdevice
    Permission should be Read And Writable as is. If not please Post the output of this command:

    Code:
    la -alh /mnt/usbdevice
    If you have issues in any of the above steps. Do not hesitate to post the error or your question or concern.

    You found one of the best linux help sites out there. And someone here will get you to where you want to be.

    77 Yrs Young......... Wow


    Jaysunn
    Jay:
    Wow is right, but not my age, but the most specific, user friendly, forum reply I have ever received. I should have been on this site several years ago.
    That being said I would be home free had I actually created a mnt. point I guess rather then just taking for granted the label created in gparted would suffice.

    debian:/home/allen# mkdir -p /mnt/data1
    debian:/home/allen# mount -t vfat -o rw,users /dev/sda1 /mnt/usbdevice
    mount: mount point /mnt/usbdevice does not exist

    So if you would be so kind as to give me that code to create the mnt point I will be there.

    FYI: Went to partition Editor and sda1 reads /media/data1

    Finally when you have nothing better to do this URL is one I did for one of my grandsons who was attending Rice. He wanted grand-dad bragging rights
    Thanks again


    linuxexperience

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    Contributors jaysunn's Avatar
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    I assumed that your mount point was /mnt/data1. And you know what happens when you assume.

    You make a A$$ out of U and Me

    ass,u,me

    HEHE



    Run this and see what we get. I change the /mnt/usbdevice to /mnt/data1


    Code:
    Prompt>mount -t vfat -o rw,users /dev/sda1 /mnt/data1
    However if you want the command to create the mount point. Here you go:

    Code:
    Prompt>mkdir -p /mnt/usbdevice
    The flag -p is for:
    -p, --parents
    no error if existing, make parent directories as needed


    Please let me know your results.


    Jaysunn
    Last edited by jaysunn; 28th August 2009 at 09:51 PM. Reason: Added -p flag information...

  5. #5
    Contributors jaysunn's Avatar
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    Default Great Blog

    You are truly a inspiration to me. Only if I had the experience on using windows 3.1 and others. You have found a great site here and I hope you continue to ask your questions here.

    I take pride in learning from the questions that I try to answer. I have been using linux for a while now. And when you think you know everything is when you are in trouble.

    Cause than you are unable to learn from asking questions.


    Good Luck With this wonderful O/S we call LINUX.

    Jaysunn

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    Member 77yrold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaysunn View Post
    I assumed that your mount point was /mnt/data1. And you know what happens when you assume.

    You make a A$$ out of U and Me

    ass,u,me

    HEHE



    Run this and see what we get. I change the /mnt/usbdevice to /mnt/data1


    Code:
    Prompt>mount -t vfat -o rw,users /dev/sda1 /mnt/data1
    However if you want the command to create the mount point. Here you go:

    Code:
    Prompt>mkdir -p /mnt/usbdevice
    The flag -p is for:
    -p, --parents
    no error if existing, make parent directories as needed


    Please let me know your results.


    Jaysunn
    Ok I will go back and start over
    So /dev/sda1 is already mounted or busy??? partition editor mounted or two keys shows
    partition File Sys Mount Point Label
    /dev/sda1 ext3 /media/Data1 Data1
    debian:/home/allen# mount -t vfat -o rw,users /dev/sda1 /mnt/data1
    mount: /dev/sda1 already mounted or /mnt/data1 busy
    mount: according to mtab, /dev/sda1 is mounted on /media/Data1
    debian:/home/allen# mkdir -p /mnt/usbdevice
    debian:/home/allen#

    Just called myself creating a mount point
    /mnt/usbdevice to /mnt/data1

    debian:/home/allen# /mnt/usbdevice to /mnt/data1
    bash: /mnt/usbdevice: is a directory

    So is my mount point a directory? Its me Jay not you.
    Do me a favor as time permits based on what I have related thus far if its enough
    go through the drill sequentially one more time (again when you can) I realize every one is not retired

    Allen
    Last edited by 77yrold; 28th August 2009 at 11:06 PM.

  7. #7
    Contributors jaysunn's Avatar
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    Let's try this. Remove the usb cable attached to the hard drive from the linux box. So disconnect it from the computer.

    type this and give me the results:

    Code:
    Prompt>fdisk -l

    Next connect the usb cable again to the linux box.

    Type this in a command prompt as root and post back the results.

    Code:
    Prompt>fdisk -l
    I want to verify the device name of your USB device.

    So is my mount point a directory?
    The mount point is where you want to mount the device on the system. It is a directory. So that's why created the directory /mnt/usbdevice.

    As for time. Do not worry. As you get good at shell scripting and automation. You can automate yourself out of job. However I am off today. So I love a challenge.


    Jaysunn
    Last edited by jaysunn; 28th August 2009 at 11:23 PM.

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    Member 77yrold's Avatar
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    The time lapse is due to my getting the info on terminal, but for whatever reason I cannot paste. Right click only shows back, reload, bookmark, show only this frame.
    Will keep trying

  9. #9
    Contributors jaysunn's Avatar
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    For copying and pasting from a ubuntu terminal give these steps a try:

    Linux: How To Copy and Paste From the Command Line


    Try this as well:

    With keyboard:
    Code:
    Copy: Ctrl+Shift+C
    Paste: Ctrl+Shift+V


    Hope this helps.

    Jaysunn

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